What’s in a Name?

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By Terry C. Brown, PT, DPT

An idea that is developed and put into action is more important than an idea that exists only as an idea. – Buddha

When you hear “Private Practice Section,” what does that name say to you? What is private practice? Who belongs to that organization?

I thought my orthopedic practice epitomized private practice, a bricks and mortar outpatient clinic owned and operated by physical therapists. This type of clinic is the foundation on which the Private Practice Section (PPS) was built, but does it still describe our members today? Is it private practice that we represent or physical therapist entrepreneurs?

Poised for Change

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By Stacy M. Menz, PT, DPT, PCS

While at the Graham Sessions in Savannah, Georgia, I had the benefit of listening to and interacting with some truly amazing people in our profession. What made it even more amazing was this group of people ranged from those who have been involved in the physical therapy profession for years and several Doctorate of Physical Therapy Students (DPT) who are just beginning their journey. The common thread among the group was their willingness to ask questions and raise issues from their individual perspectives. I left the meeting with ideas of next steps for my practice as well as things that I hope to help drive in our profession.

A Winning Combination

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Celebrating individual successes is key to organizational success.

By C. Jason Richardson, DPT, OCS, COMT

As a practice grows, one of the hardest things to maintain is a culture that celebrates the wins. Adding therapists, support staff, and billing personnel makes it infinitely harder as a practice owner or manager to remain in tune to everyone’s impact on their areas of responsibility. This growth also increases the degrees of separation, which further dilutes our abilities to recognize staff for excellent work that fuels a private practice’s successes.

With growth, it is imperative for organizations to understand the psychology of praising staff for their great work and creating an employee recognition program. Making a conscious effort to foster a culture of recognition and create an infrastructure that celebrates the wins and publically acknowledges those who go above and beyond for our patients and teammates will yield massive value on investment.

Now?

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By Lynn Steffes, PT, DPT

I am not sure how many of you have had the opportunity to read Brian Tracy’s book Eat That Frog? It is a wonderful read! In his book, the author explores the power of overcoming procrastination. He advises that we should all eat our “frogs” (unpleasant challenges) beginning with the ugliest ones first!

I am afraid that physical therapy is one of those activities. For years, we joked that physical therapy was an acronym for “Pain & Torture”! Dealing with pain or limitations can be frustrating and results that take four to six weeks to obtain are less motivating than the perceived quick fix from a pill that acts in twenty minutes or an adjustment that feels better fast.

2015 R. Charles Harker, Esq. Policy Maker Award

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We are happy to announce that HPA The Catalyst (the Section on Health Policy & Administration of APTA) wishes to recognize Sandra Norby’s, PT, numerous contributions to health policy with the 2015 R. Charles Harker, Esq. Policy Maker Award.

This award was created in 1997 by the Section on Health Policy, Legislation & Regulation (now the Section on Health Policy & Administration) to recognize APTA members whose actions have significantly impacted health policy, who have demonstrated leadership in health policy making at the state or national levels, and initiated a policy shift of broad magnitude for the profession.

Sandra Norby, PT, of Le Mars Physical Therapy, PLLC has been a physical therapist since 1989, when she graduated from the University of Iowa with her master’s physical therapy. Sandy has also been a certified athletic trainer for many years. Her primary focus today is orthopedics including sports, work injuries, and total joints. She also has experience in neurological rehab for strokes and balance problems. Sandy has a strong personal commitment for the physical health and wellness for the people of Plymouth County. Norby most recently was the director of Rehab for the Center of Neurosciences, Orthopedics and Spine in Dakota Dunes, South Dakota. She is well-known in the Siouxland medical community. Norby is involved in the American Physical Therapy Association, serving on the Reimbursement Committees of both the Iowa PT Association and the Private Practice Section.

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