Stunning, Amazing, Humbling

Sandra-Norby
By Sandra Norby, PT, DPT

Recently, I finished my 9th consecutive Surf City Half Marathon, which was the 45th half marathon and 60th organized run over 10 miles for me. Training was tough in frosty Iowa, but I was confident of a strong finish without injury. A Huntington Beach firefighter ran the marathon wearing 70 pounds of fire gear, including his breathing apparatus—stunning, amazing, humbling.

It’s Not About You: Why You Should Never “Sell Yourself” as a Physical Therapist

By Paul Gough, BSC (HONS), MCSP, SRP, HPC*

The idea that you “have to sell yourself” to patients if you want their custom at your clinic isn’t true.

This idea, better known as advice for landing a job, comes with the false belief that people who need physical therapy make decisions on things like your skills, how many continuing education credits you’ve accrued, how many years of experience you have, how many awards you’ve won, and so on.

Perspectives on Staffing

StacyMenz
By Stacy M. Menz, PT, DPT, PCS

One of the things I find most interesting in my role as the editor for Impact magazine is how it provides me with perspective. This month’s issue covers the topic of staff recruitment and retention. I remember last year when we published an issue with a similar theme, I was waiting with bated breath for this issue to come out. My practice had just gone through a major restructure and nearly my entire team turned over for one reason or another. I couldn’t wait to read the issue to find those gems that I could implement to hopefully never experience the same situation of full staff turnover again.

Stepping Back to Lead

Time to step back from patient care and step up to practice management.

By Chris Wilson, PT, DPT

Most of us became physical therapists to help people and to change lives. We are “doers”, so we chose to “do” physical therapy; however, our vision for how we would change lives can vary vastly. For some, the vision was to open one’s own practice from the beginning. For others, the vision grew while observing areas of practice on which they could improve. The challenge rests with how we define “doing” and staying true to our “why”—changing lives, not our “how”–being a clinician. The challenge is stepping back to lead.

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