Value-Based Care: How to Participate

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The first in a series of articles prepared by the PPS Payment Policy Committee.

By Rick Katz, PT, DPT, MA

Value-based care is often defined as demonstrating the relationship between patient outcomes and cost.

Protect Your Legacy: A New Metrics Model for Long-Term Success

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Take a counterintuitive approach to cost control.

By Jeanine Gunn, PT, DPT, and Heather Chavin, MA

Private practice owners are all familiar with the cost containment portion of the Quadruple Aim (enhancing patient experience, improving population health, reducing costs, and improving the work life of health care providers, including clinicians and staff).1 Metrics like vacancy rate, denial rates, new patients, and units per hour all make our list of key performance indicators (KPIs).

Outcomes Reporting Systems: What Matters?

The right system for collecting and reporting outcomes will have several features, one of which is reporting.

By Al Amato, PT, MBA*

The value of patient-reported outcomes (PROs) permeates health care. Patient-centered care demands that the patient’s perception be placed at the center of health care decision making.

Electronic Health Records

Electronic Health Records

Critical features for practice management.

By Stefan Young, OD

The use of electronic health records (EHRs) has surpassed electronic medical records (EMRs) in many health care offices—especially regarding features critical to good practice management. Simple EMRs typically only consist of digital documentation of your record for a given patient. Electronic health records have the capability to be multidisciplinary. For me, as an optometrist working in a hospital setting, this is a very exciting development. Formerly it was a tedious chore obtaining lab results, verifying pertinent medical history, medications, and co-managing with other specialists. EHRs make these and other tasks simpler, faster, and easier.

Mindfulness

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How to begin, and begin again.

By Daphne R. Scott

By 2014, the concept of mindfulness began to hit mainstream. Who doesn’t want to be “mindful”? The promises of less stress and getting more out of life seem to be the ground in which mindfulness rooted itself in our modern world. Utilization among business leaders quickly propelled the use of mindfulness to the top of effective business practices.

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