Employee Professional Development

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What exactly is professional development and why is it important?

By John Lowe, PT

Managing any business entails being responsible for certain aspects of the business that are essential to its continued operation. These typically include making sure employees and bills are being paid in a timely manner, following up on the status of accounts receivable, dealing with landlords and other vendors, and in the case of health care facilities making sure that the facility is prepared to pass audits. Physical therapy managers are also frequently required to generate revenue. And last but definitely not least they have a responsibility to and for their employees.

Tools to Reduce Burnout

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The right technology can improve operations and your bottom line.

By Brian J. Gallagher, PT*

In today’s world, we could not imagine running our private practice without the proper electronic medical record (EMR) system in place. Not that long ago many therapists’ documentation of sessions consisted of handwritten notes that were often illegible and/or incomplete. This made it difficult for coworkers and payers to review notes and get the accurate information needed about a patient’s care. We not only needed an improved system for documentation, but we also needed enhanced technology that could bring together multiple systems of control into one area. As a result, we now have a wide range of EMR systems available to us that offer scheduling, billing, and practice management solutions in one product. Another technology tool that can help us in our day-to-day practice is the use of virtual or video technology. But first, let’s start with EMR.

Teaching the Game of Life

How physical therapists can thrive in tomorrow’s market.

By Brett Roberts, PT, DPT

“Your economic security does not lie in your job; it lies in your own power to produce—to think, to learn, to create, to adapt…”1 —Stephen Covey

Our profession is in need of a change in focus. Specifically, the focus of our professional training, which has been too clinically based, much to our unintended detriment. Unless we recreate our profession to include understanding of the economics of health care and best business practices, we run the risk of becoming obsolete in the ever-changing health care market. As patient responsibility for health care decisions increases, our ability to accurately discuss our value in that system will provide us with the economic security that Covey mentions.

Responsible Compliance

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Bringing new energy to compliance programs through innovation.

By Rebecca K. Wojcik, PT, EdD, GCS

I would hypothesize that most physical therapists think of compliance programs as a burden existing primarily for the concern of practice administrators. We assume that no one starts out wanting to cut corners or risk noncompliance with the many laws, regulations, and policies inherent in contemporary practice. But often the demands of clinical practice can tempt even the most “compliant” physical therapist to skip a portion of documentation, defer an audit, or selectively audit only cases that comply with regulations. There is huge psychological pressure, probably rooted in childhood experiences, not to be a whistleblower or watchdog over one’s peers, much less over one’s own behavior and everyday practices to comply with regulations. In addition, the normalization of deviation or “getting away with” noncompliant actions many times without “getting caught” is a powerful reinforcer of lapses and infractions.

Young Influencers

Millenials

Millennials are 75 million strong in the workforce and the economy—how to capture the attention of this generation.

By Ingrid Sparrow, PT, CMPT

With this January’s inauguration of a new president, it is unclear what changes will occur in the national health care insurance system. But what is clear, and is hopefully included in your annual planning, is the significant impact of the Millennial generation in the workforce and as health care consumers.

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