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Perspectives

Margot Miller

By Margot Miller, PT

I HAVE HAD THE PRIVILEGE OF BEING A MEMBER OF THE IMPACT EDITORIAL Board for more than 10 years. I became involved with Impact even before we had a formal editorial board—then I became a board member and moved to my current role of assis- tant managing editor a couple of years ago. Through Impact and PPS I have met more members and developed more relationships than I ever would have by simply being a member! Since this is my last year on the board, I wanted to share some perspectives that I believe define Impact and PPS.

Just Ask. As is true in many organizations, Impact counts on volunteers. It is the respon- sibility of Impact board members to find authors who are willing to contribute articles. This task requires asking, following up with authors to make sure articles are on track, as well as performing an initial edit. What surprises me is how easily we find authors! People are genuinely pleased to contribute. We have a wide range of topics that interest authors as well as other PPS members. Sharing knowledge regarding a special technique, special niche, or particular approach helps all therapists in private practice.

You Do Not Have to Be a Superstar. Any one of us can add value to Impact and PPS read- ership. To illustrate this point, I was asked to write an article about cash-based physical therapy services for the January 2008 issue. I remember approaching the article assum- ing that cash-based services were appropriate for the older, wealthier consumer and pri- marily for services the consumer did not really need. How wrong I was! Luckily, through interviewing PPS members who had implemented cash-based options into their practice, I was set straight. I talked with Mark Blankespoor, PT, DPT; Jennifer Beal, PT, DPT, CLT- LANA; Vrinda Hatti, MPT, OTR; and Jennifer Gamboa, PT, DPT, OCS. They each took time to educate me so that I could deliver the correct message to PPS members. I did not have all the knowledge, but I was willing to learn.

Impact’s scope continues to evolve. In recent years, we have added topics that we never had eight or 10 years ago. Physical Therapy for the Oncology Patient, Aqua Therapy for Athletes, Article Analysis, Five Minute Fix, and more. Articles can be digested in a small amount of time, and even if an article is about a service or approach that does not apply to you today, it may in the future. In addition, PPS membership runs the gamut—from novice to seasoned therapists—which further broadens interests and topics.

Willingness. PPS is comprised of members who willingly support fellow members. A connection often begins at the annual conference through networking opportunities, forums, roundtables, education sessions, and more. Once a connection is made, you have a friend, colleague, or mentor for life. I am a member of other sections, but find PPS to be more “personal” due to members’ willingness to share with and learn from each other.I experienced this for myself as I approached potential authors to write for Impact. I attended a session at the annual conference a few years ago presented by Carl DeRosa, PT, PHD, FAPTA, on how physical therapists are uniquely positioned to be central players in wellness and prevention. After the session, I asked Carl if he would be willing to write for the May 2010 Impact issue focused on wellness and fitness. He graciously agreed! This willingness defines PPS and our members.

Camaraderie. Camaraderie is defined as “the spirit of familiarity and trust existing between friends.” I believe this embodies PPS members. Friends and colleagues come together andsupport one another, even though they differ in size of practice, years in business, and services provided. Support for and trust between colleagues is fundamental to the success of the section as a whole. By volunteering your time and talents, you will become part of this dynamic community.

Choose the level of volunteering that works best for you, whether it be part of a committee or task force, running for office, or contributing an article. We can make a difference and move our profession forward by working together. See for yourself!

Professional regards,

Margot Miller sig

Margot Miller, PT

Assistant Managing Editor, Impact